Posts Tagged “Periodontal disease”

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Yes, according to a new study.
This study evaluated the association between body mass index (BMI) and periodontal condition in a population of Brazilian women. A hospital convenience sample of 594 eligible women was recruited from a women’s health reference center of Belo Horizonte, Brazil. Four groups were formed considering BMI levels: BMI normal group (n = 352), overweight (n = 54), obesity level I (n = 48), obesity level II (n = 56), and obesity level III (n = 74). Full-mouth periodontal examination was performed and biological, demographic, and behavioral risk variables were evaluated. Obese and overweight women showed statistically significant differences in bleeding on probing, probing depth and clinical attachment level ≥4 mm, and frequency of periodontitis (p < 0.05) compared to women showing normal BMI. The final multivariate model for the occurrence of periodontitis revealed that obesity groups were significantly associated with periodontitis. In addition, age (25-45), smoking, diabetes, and hypertension remained significantly associated with the occurrence of periodontitis (p < 0.05). Periodontitis was positively associated with obesity, and this association was more evident as obesity levels increases. These findings indicate the need for early diagnosis and the inclusion of periodontal care in health care programs for obese women.

Periodontal disease is looking like another complication related to obesity.

So, please, watch your diet and exercise regularly.

Your body will really thank you for your diligence.

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Nearly three fourths of adults have some degree of periodontal disease. Aside from the traditionally discussed dental complications of gum recession, tooth root decay, tooth loss, bite collapse and bad breath, there are now well documented medical complications of periodontal disease, such as heart disease, stroke, diabetes, and peripheral vascular disease.

Apparently so.

The number of adults in the U.S. suffering from periodontal disease may be significantly higher than previous research has indicated, according to a study published online today in the Journal of Dental Research (September 21, 2010).

The study, conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the American Academy of Periodontology (AAP), researchers appear to have underestimated by as much as 50% how many cases of moderate to severe periodontitis actually exist in the U.S. population.

Because of the ever increasing research that suggests the connection between periodontal disease and systemic health, it is important that Americans have regular dental examinations and dental hygiene.

So, don’t procrastinate and make an appointment to see your dentist today.

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